Data Collection Patterns in Hospitals of Tabriz

  • Faramarz Pourasghar Medical informatics research team, Department of Medical Informatics, School of Health Management and Medical Informatics, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi Tabriz Health Services Management Research Center, Department of Health Services Management, School of Health Management and Medical Informatics, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Mohammad Asghari Jafarabadi Road Traffic Injury Research Center, Faculty of Health, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
  • Leila Abdollahi Department of Health Services Management and Students Research Committee, School of Health Management and Medical Informatics, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
Keywords: Hospital Information System, Data Collection, Data Quality

Abstract

Purpose: Considering the importance of information in hospitals, this study assessed the common pattern of data collection in Tabriz hospitals and the reasons explaing them.

Methods: The study had a descriptive cross-sectional design and all the hospitals in Tabriz city were studied (census). The questionnaire was developed by the researchers consisting of two parts (information about the HIS and indicators for hospital data collection). The content validity of the questionnaire was verified by a panel of experts.

Results: Out of the 20 participating hospitals, 19 hospitals were equipped with HIS. In eligible hospitals, the data used to be recorded as 48% manually, 28% by computer, 15% through both methods, and in 9% the indicators were not recorded. Indicators of demographic information entry and their modification; list of prepared medicines for inpatients in hospital pharmacy; and entry of the number of free beds in the wards had the highest rates of computerized data entry upto a proportion of 80%. Indicators of patients' clinical information as well as the safety and data regarding complaints had the highest manual recording rate among the studied hospitals with a proportion of upto 90%. The reasons that the staff didn’t use the HIS included; unnecessary complexity; unfriendliness of the software; poor quality of the used hardware and shortage of options on the software; laws and regulations; fearand personnel’s viewpoints, and finally the hospital approach or policy.

Conclusion: Despite spending much cost and time to implement and maintain the HIS, still almost half of the data entry was being done manually. It requires the policies of using the HIS systems to be revised.
Published
2014-05-01